Concrete &amp; Masonry https://www.protradecraft.com/ en Simple Concrete Slab Seam Repair https://www.protradecraft.com/video/simple-concrete-slab-seam-repair <span>Simple Concrete Slab Seam Repair</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/16/2021 - 05:00</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/yWTJ3lzFtAg&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=EA71TdV13FFz9hpDiX4eUchafTqWTEOo-5Uqb44WrjY" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="How to Patch or Repair Chipped and Broken Concrete"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>How to fix edge chips where one concrete slab meets another</h2> <p>Cold joints at the driveway/garage slab connection can get damaged over time from the movement when vehicles drive in and out. If the slabs are not adequately separated from each other, chips pop off the edges as the weight shifts from one slab to the other.</p> <h2>Steps to repairing the concrete chip damage</h2> <ul> <li>Clean out the damaged area. David uses a pressure washer.</li> <li>Apply bonding agent to the clean damaged surface. Confine bonding agent to the damaged area, clean it from the finished slabs before it dries. Use a brush to apply it and a sponge to clean it up. </li> <li>Allow bonding agent to dry to a tacky texture, about five to ten minutes, depending on the weather.</li> <li>Mix the repair mortar to a stiff mix. Add water slowly using a sponge to add little by little until the texture is stiff and wet.</li> <li>Trowel the concrete into the damaged areas, keeping separation from the adjacent slab. Flatten the top into the slab, roughly round over the edge, and keep the new concrete from touching the adjacent slab.</li> <li>Let each patch set up while you move on to the next damaged area.</li> <li>Shape the partially-cured patch. Use a sponge to clean the adjacent surfaces and smooth the patched area into the shape you want: blending flat into the top of the slab and rounding over the edge.</li> </ul> <p><strong>A reminder that <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=concrete+burns&amp;source=lnms&amp;tbm=isch&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwjLreOgiKTyAhUFT98KHfnaD0MQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&amp;biw=1314&amp;bih=825&amp;dpr=2" target="_blank">concrete is caustic</a></strong> and will burn your skin. Make sure to wash your hands if they come into contact with concrete, as David's do in this video.</p> <p><em>—David Odell owns <a href="https://www.odellcompleteconcrete.com/" target="_blank">Odell Complete Concrete</a> in southern California. His <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5y5SeEYvz_MqPmBU_zLTyA" target="_blank">YouTube</a> channel is updated regularly. Sometimes you can see him in </em>Professional Remodeler<em> magazine, too.</em></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 16 Aug 2021 10:00:00 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4858 at https://www.protradecraft.com 6 Ways Brick Veneer Walls Shed Water https://www.protradecraft.com/video/6-ways-brick-veneer-walls-shed-water <span>6 Ways Brick Veneer Walls Shed Water </span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/09/2021 - 05:00</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/NgWo18yKEpk&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=Wr7yaSD71NiFz9zWQSwfZxX0OiJavCyrGaPxcQIN6pw" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="150" class="media-oembed-content" title="Moisture Management in Residential Construction Series - Brick Installation Drainage Cavity Wall"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>Brick is a durable and good-looking cladding choice, and with correct details, the wall behind it will last as long as the brick</h2> <p>Let's face it, if you're going to spend the money on a cladding that will last over a hundred years, the structure should last as long as the cladding, right?</p> <p>Here's a quick look at water- and moisture-control mechanisms in a brick veneer wall, courtesy of the <a href="https://www.homeinnovation.com/" target="_blank">Home Innovation Research Labs</a>. The video is ten years old (as of 2021), but even back in 2011, there had been a long history of forgotten details, which is probably why they made this video.</p> <p>None of the details covered in this video are new, but many seem to have been largely forgotten sometime between the fifties and the nineties.</p> <p> </p> <h2>A gap behind brick allows liquid water to drop down and ventilation air to rise up</h2> <p>The gap can be sabotaged by mortar droppings bridging the space, which channel water from the brick's surface directly into the structural wall behind the brick. If the wall is framed from wood, it can rot behind the brick without anyone ever noticing. </p> <p>If the wall is made from cinder blocks, the water can rot the drywall, cabinets and attack interior partition walls.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Through-wall flashing kicks water out from the wall at important locations</h2> <p>You can use flexible flashing or rigid metal flashing as long as it will last as long as the brick. The flashing should push water that hits the WRB to the outer face of the brick below it. It can be installed at the foundation/wall interface and below windows and doors for short buildings.</p> <p>Taller buildings should also install through-wall flashing where each story starts, or else the lower sections can become overloaded with bulk water from multiple stories. </p> <p>It is important for the through-wall flashing to be tucked behind the WRB. If the flashing is a peel-and-stick product, it can be stuck to the surface, but it is better to cut the WRB and properly overlap the layers.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Two Layers of building paper</h2> <p>Felt paper is a more durable material than most house wraps in continual contact with mortar droppings. A second sacrificial layer tremendously extends the life span of the water barrier.</p> <p>An extra layer of 15-pound felt paper is installed over the flashing, and house wrap breaks the capillary action of the mortar droppings. And resists the acidic damage from the mortar.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Weep holes allow water to drain out of the cavity</h2> <p>Spaced 16-inches to 24-inches apart, weep holes can be manufactured products or site-fashioned. A convenient product is made from plastic with corrugations that allow liquid water to pass but keep bugs out.</p> <p>A traditional method was for brick masons to use short lengths of organic rope that would rot away fairly quickly. The rope holds the mortar in the right shape until the mortar dries, allowing drainage in the meantime.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Window and door flashing</h2> <p>Sill flashing below windows and doors should include end-dams at least 2-inches high to deflect water away from the cavity and to the outside. Weep holes should be placed at each end dam and spaced appropriately between the end dams.</p> <p>Window sills should be sloped away from the wall to promote drainage. This video shows using brick as the sill, which is a common cost-saving practice.</p> <p>A better and more traditional choice for horizontal surfaces is a nonporous material, such as stone.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Roof/wall interface</h2> <p>The top of the wall is vented, which allows air circulation through natural circulation. The vent outlet is usually covered with a soffit.</p> <p>Roof overhangs also protect the walls from water by covering the top of the wall and keeping a percentage of it dry during rainstorms. Larger overhangs protect larger percentages of the walls.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>—This video comes from the Home Innovation Research Labs, an independent subsidiary of the <a href="https://www.nahb.org/">National Association of Home Builders</a> (NAHB)</em></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 09 Aug 2021 10:00:31 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4857 at https://www.protradecraft.com Concrete Combat 1: Wall to Wall https://www.protradecraft.com/video/concrete-combat-1-wall-wall <span>Concrete Combat 1: Wall to Wall</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Fri, 07/23/2021 - 10:58</span> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>SPONSOR CONTENT</h2> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-builder field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--media paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field-name-field-media field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/p_ZopnZ94Uc&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=ToqSRbN3W0bXkyF6bqnrf6ypAZ3a21K6gXE9kMRJHgM" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="Concrete Combat | Episode 1: Wall to Wall"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--text paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field-name-field-copy field-type-text-long field-label-hidden field-item"><p><a href="https://www.sakrete.com/" target="_blank"><img alt="sakrete-logo.png" src="https://www.protradecraft.com/sites/protradecraft/files/2019-04/sakrete-logo_0.png" style="margin: 9px; width: 150px; float: right;" /></a></p> <h2>Drystack retaining wall vs. traditional mortar and block retaining wall</h2> <p>The premier episode of "Concrete Combat" pits the traditional method for building a concrete block retaining wall against a new approach using a surface-bonding cement over a dry-stack block wall. Both walls are judged on neatness, cost, and ability to withstand blows from a sledgehammer after curing.</p> <p>The winner of the Concrete Combat retaining wall challenge moves on to the semi-finals, and the loser goes home.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>—This video is provided by <a href="http://goo.gl/8a27ML" target="_blank">Sakrete</a>, one of ProTradeCraft's advertisers. A leader in concrete and concrete-related products for 80 years, Sakrete led the way for premixed bagged concrete and was the first company to provide concrete specified for strength, not proportion, which continues today.</em> <em><a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/sakrete-videos-and-guides">View all of Sakrete's content</a></em></p> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 23 Jul 2021 15:58:14 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4854 at https://www.protradecraft.com Building Resilience (3): A Frostproof, Waterproof, Warm, and Dry Foundation https://www.protradecraft.com/video/building-resilience-3-frostproof-waterproof-warm-and-dry-foundation <span>Building Resilience (3): A Frostproof, Waterproof, Warm, and Dry Foundation</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/21/2020 - 11:00</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/1_8Dd_BluqU&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=fdNWYGWEb3tvt8bnpkOOD_NIrVib5ClYgJU6yfYRgSE" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="Building Resilience 3 Foundation Water and Frost Protection"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>A basement built with frost heave in mind</h2> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">The last time on Building Resilience, we were taking a bird’s eye view of the project scope, and an ant’s eye view of some demolition.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><em>MA: The project overall scope involves taking the house from 1700 square feet to 3500 square feet. It’s going to go from three bedrooms to six bedrooms, and from one bathroom to four.</em></p> <p><em>We’re tearing stucco off the original house</em></p> <p><em>We’re going to put up Huber’s ZIP R-12, which is an insulated sheathing. Two inches of insulation and ½-inch OSB with an integrated weather resistive barrier over that.</em></p> <p><em>We’re going to be adding a rainscreen system from Benjamin Obdyke—</em></p> <p><em>We’re going to be adding a rainscreen system from Benjamin Obdyke so that it stays dry and breathes well.</em></p> <p><em>Then we’re going to be putting some ¾-inch AZEK cellular PVC panels with PaintPro technology over all that to give it a really contemporary look.</em></p> <p><em>We’re going to be replacing all of the windows in the house with triple pane windows from Marvin. Again, looking for ultimate resiliency with a fiberglass frame that’s not going to rot out on us. And the triple glazing for sound, insulation, and condensation resistance.</em></p> <p><em>Overall the house is going to be a lot more livable, a lot more durable, a lot more efficient, ultimately, it’s going to be a pretty darned resilient house.</em></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">With the old addition in the recycle bin, and the recycle bin on the truck, it’s time to get to work building the foundation. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">We like to turn the cameras on when people don’t realize it because it gives us a little more reality in the show. Here. We learn what a sand boulder is: wet sand that freezes. While they are convenient for holding down plastic, they can also heave a footing up and away from where you pour it. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none"> </span></span></span></span></span></span><em>MA: Alright, we got the addition off the back of the house, and that’s a good thing.</em></p> <p><em>And we dug a giant pit and that’s a good thing. We’ve got footings and foundation, and insulation and waterproofing and slip sheet all in. </em></p> <p><em>Now we’re tenting over the foundation. This is because it is cold outside, and it's going to get colder. We’re going to be subzero for a couple of days, and without a cap on here, the soils would freeze and wreak havoc on our brand new foundation, which would be no bueno.</em></p> <p><em>As you can see it's a really nice playground-style sand. It's very consistent, it's not too fine, it's got fantastic drainage.</em></p> <p><em>It really—in many ways—serves the site really well. But now with temperatures dropping, we’ve got some snow coming in, if we didn’t cover the foundation, this stuff would get wet and freeze. And because the water gets into the sand so quickly, it would freeze right around our footing and potentially under the footing, and soils will heave here, and that would wreak havoc on the entire structure.</em></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Let’s peel back the layers of this foundation to see what makes it less likely to heave from frost.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><em>MA: CMU wall, commonly referred to as a foundation. Here’s our dampproofing, our waterproofing. A bituminous product that is adhered to the block. Keeps it dry. Three inches of the pink stuff—we’re having a baby, so we decided to get the pink stuff this time. Plus, it's a good product.</em></p> <p><em>Three inches gives us R-15 on the outside of the foundation, we’ll talk about why that’s so important some other time. And thern we have the slip sheet.</em></p> <p><em>And the slip sheet is something that evidently a lot of people haven’t seen. We hadn’t seen them until recently in Minnesota until they became part of the code. The purpose of the slip sheet is to keep the soils, which can freeze solid down to about four feet, from bonding with the insulation. And as the spoils move and heave, during freeze/thaw cycles, potentially ripping the insulation off the foundation.</em></p> <p><em>They are a pain to install. In sandy soils we are lucky, the install goes fairly well. When we backfill, they don’t get shredded, but in clay soils, where the soil is really heavy, this plastic oftentimes gets ripped pretty badly and it gets ugly. </em></p> <p><em>But, this is what it's supposed to look like, and the theory behind it is solid. It’s just the practical installation isn’t so great.</em></p> <p><em>This is our footer, or footing. Its ten-inches thick, two-feet wide, our drain tile is on the outside of the structure and this is our connection point. See how this sand just fills itself back in, it’s a joy to work with (not).</em></p> <p><em>The CMU wall has wire reinforcement every other course and then rebar every four feet, and then it's core-filled. </em></p> <p><em>The top is a bonding beam of sorts that connects the whole thing together, and that’s solid filled.</em></p> <p><em>Here is the original foundation. We drilled into the original blockwork and pinned this foundation to that foundation. This helps to eliminate any difference in movement the first couple of years on a foundation there can be some shifting. Soil type tends to drive that a little bit. </em></p> <p><em>We’re not going to see a lot of movement with sand of this quality, so things should be pretty stable.</em></p> <p><em>This is a hundred and two year old foundation, and while the masons had a lot of commentary about what they don’t think is the best blockwork—and their blockwork is pretty good—I feel that anything that manages to go a century and look this solid and stable without any cracks or defects, I think they did a fine job.</em></p> <p><em>Underneath our slab we have some critical elements. The first is our capillary break—rock, half-inch or larger in diameter, and that ensures that water can’t wick up into the slab.</em></p> <p><em>Some people think that sheet of plastics that goes under the slab is the capillary break, it is NOT. That’s a vapor gas/soil gas control layer. Minnesota is a high risk for radon, so we always have plastic under our slabs. The rock, however, is the capillary break.</em></p> <p><em>The next thing that we do that’s a little bit different is we have some XPS insulation that we put at the edge of the slab. This ensures that we have a thermal break between our slab and our foundation wall. There’s no reason for the concrete slab to be bonded, touching, or connected to our foundation wall. It’s not a structural slab. Obviously there are exceptions to that rule, but this is not one. </em></p> <p><em>Then over the top of the footing we have two-inches of insulation and then across the entirety of the floor we have three inches of insulation for R-15.</em></p> <p><em>Now, why don’t we have R-15 against the wall? Because on the opposite side of this wall we already have R-15. So we’re really just looking to make sure there’s no thermal transfer through the footing itself here into the Earth.</em></p> <p><em>And at this corner here, we’re already at R-15 on the other side so it's a very warm corner. We’re not going to see any of those conditions where you have weird condensing corners taking place on the slab. It’s a super-simple detail, it works amazingly, and the slab doesn’t need in-floor heat to be warm. Because it’s not losing heat to the ground and to the walls, just heating this room, the slab will take on some of that heat, kind of like a giant radiator and throw it back to you, like a T-mass (thermal mass) type of thing.</em></p> <p><em>...So, that’s our floor.</em></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">And we’ll pour that floor after we frame one over the foundation and sheathe it with Advantech subflooring, a resilient subfloor that stands up well to the elements.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">And then we’ll build some walls on top of that. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">It turns out, there are three types of wall in this little addition, and we’ll use Regular ZIP System sheathing, an exterior gypsum product, for a very local reason. We will also use ZIP System R-12 insulated sheathing.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><em>MA: On this wall we’ve got ZIP R-12 over 2x4 framing. We’ll finish it out on the other side with our rain Slicker from Benjamin Obdyke, and then our AZEK ¾ inch PVC panel system on top of that. </em></p> </blockquote> <p style="line-height:1.38"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Make sure to tune in next time to Building Resilience.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><em>—<a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/building-resilience">Building Resilience</a> is produced by ProTradeCraft for <a href="https://horizontv.proremodeler.com/" target="_blank">Horizon TV</a>.</em></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 21 Aug 2020 16:00:00 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4807 at https://www.protradecraft.com Stucco Repair: How to Close That Can of Worms You Just Opened https://www.protradecraft.com/video/stucco-repair-how-close-can-worms-you-just-opened <span>Stucco Repair: How to Close That Can of Worms You Just Opened</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/15/2020 - 08:46</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/ZcL2g-XTDKc&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=BDUOerG32sBiStwAmkczXU5fe6shpLXPxy2gBf-R7sQ" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="stucco cracks, why stucco walls hairline crack, best caulking for cracking stucco."></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>Sanded acrylic latex caulk can fill cracks and feather into existing stucco better than smooth caulk</h2> <p>There are about ten paragraphs on why stucco walls crack, and Kirk Giordano (Kirk Giordano's Plastering) isn't going into it right now.</p> <p>In this case, the stucco, about one-inch thick, runs down to the concrete slab, which is about three inches thick.</p> <p>When it rains, the expansive soil lifts the house, as it drys, the house settles back down. When it settles, hairline cracking around window openings appear. </p> <p>You can repair those cracks with caulk; Kirk uses <a href="https://www.sashco.com/products/mor-flexx/" target="_blank">Mor-flexx sanded caulk</a> to blend in with the stucco. As Kirk explains why caulking the stucco cracks isn't always the best idea, because "...something's gotta give, it's either three solid inches (of concrete) or one-inch (of stucco)," he discovers scope creep in real-time on video.</p> <p>Kirk discovers a hollow sound, so he doe3s what anyone would do: he starts whacking it with his hammer.</p> <p>He uncovers the wall profile: a layer of stucco over the stucco,</p> <blockquote> <p>"You know what guys, that's not a great idea, but at least we've located the weak spot right here.</p> <p>Wow, okay, I've opened a can of worms, but that's okay. Nothing we can't handle."</p> </blockquote> <p>He peels off the loose stucco with his trowel and then highjacks a load of mud from his daughter as she moves it to the addition they're plastering.</p> <blockquote> <p>Plastering is about improvising. </p> </blockquote> <p>After cleaning the opening with a wire brush and wetting the surface with a bonding agent, he fills the can of worms, getting back to the original point of the video: crack repair with caulk.</p> <p>To make the caulked seam disappear, use a sanded caulk. Different brands have different sand, so you may be able to dial in a better match based on the stucco in your area. For this house, he thinks Mor-flexx is about right. </p> <p>If you ask him about caulk for sanded grout, he'll say this:</p> <blockquote> <p>"Ha. You coul;d use those caulkings, but the grout has finer sand. So, when you're trying to match this, you can see, it's much heavier sand."</p> </blockquote> <p>For small cracks, you can apply caulk over them and then work it in and feather it out with your hands and a trowel. Polyurethane caulk will not work for this.</p> <p>To feather in the stucco that's patching the can of worms, he uses a wet sponge float to ease the edges into the existing.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 15 Jun 2020 13:46:06 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4775 at https://www.protradecraft.com Rejuvenating Old Concrete Surfaces with Sakrete FloCoat https://www.protradecraft.com/video/rejuvenating-old-concrete-surfaces-sakrete-flocoat <span>Rejuvenating Old Concrete Surfaces with Sakrete FloCoat</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/sakrete" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sakrete</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/02/2020 - 00:00</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h3>SPONSOR CONTENT</h3> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> </article> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field-name-field-copy field-type-text-long field-label-hidden field-item"><p><a href="https://www.sakrete.com/" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="/sites/protradecraft/files/u3/Sakrete_logo_badge-150w.png" style="float:right; margin:10px; width:150px" /></a></p> <h2>A flowable concrete coating that makes a patchy old slab new again</h2> <p>Flo-Coat is a concrete resurfacer material that is designed for taking old, worn concrete surfaces and making them look like new. The great thing about Flo-Coat is that it is applied with a squeegee, it’s not necessary to get down on your hands and knees with a trough as is most common with concrete resurfacing products. </p> <p> </p> <h3>Mixing:</h3> <ul> <li>Provides superior bond to properly prepared and clean concrete surfaces. No additional polymer needed, just add water and mix</li> <li>Follow mixing instructions on the package.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3>Application:</h3> <ul> <li>Pour mixed product onto the concrete surface.</li> <li>Using a squeegee, push or pull the material across the concrete surface to spread it evenly. Flo-Coat Resurfacer may be applied from feather edge to 1/2” in thickness. Tap the squeegee periodically to remove excess material. Using an old towel, wipe the squeegee to remove all material before finishing.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3>Finishing:</h3> <ul> <li>Once the product has been applied smoothly and evenly over the entire surface, take a broom and add texture to the surface. This is to prevent the concrete from being slick when finished. Using a broom can also help remove any squeegee lines you may have created when applying the product.</li> </ul> <div class="adminContent float-left"> <h4> </h4> <h3>Tools needed:</h3> <ul> <li>Long handled squeegee</li> <li>Drill and mixing paddle</li> <li>5-gallon bucket</li> <li>Broom</li> </ul> <h4> </h4> <h3>Transcript:</h3> <p>The product we’re going to be taking a look at now is Sakrete Flo-Coat Concrete Resurfacer. </p> <p>Flo-Coat is a concrete resurfacer material which is designed for taking old, worn concrete surfaces and making them look like new. The great thing about Flo-Coat is that it is applied with a squeegee, it’s not necessary to get down on your hands and knees with a trough as is most common with concrete resurfacing products. </p> <p>Ok, now that we’ve thoroughly mixed the product we’re going to pour it out. You can see how fluid it is, I’m just going to pour a little bit out right here, I’m going to stop there and I’m going to grab my squeegee and you can see it does flow very nicely but you still need a little bit of work with the squeegee. </p> <p>You can see I’ve put the squeegee down and what I’m doing is I’m not really putting any pressure on this, I’m simply pulling the squeegee backward and allowing it to drag the Flo-Coat along with it. It really doesn’t matter what direction you pull it in, so we can push it or pull it, it really doesn’t matter.</p> <p>You’ll notice that periodically I tap the squeegee, the reason I’m doing that is as you are doing this the material begins to dry on the squeegee a little bit. If you have hard material in there it will leave an indentation in the finished product. </p> <p>What I’m doing right now, I’m taking a rag and I’m wiping off some of the excess that will build up after a while and what I’m trying to do now is I’m trying to put a nice finishing coat on and to take some of the imperfections out from when the material had dropped previously. </p> <p>Now that we have the flow coat down, I want to take a broom and I’m dragging it across the Flo-Coat. The reason is that concrete is much safer if it has a little bit of texture, if you put a hard finish on concrete it can be very slippery, but by putting a broom finish on it you give it a little bit of texture. So when it gets wet it’s not slippery. </p> <p>Also, if you’ve had any difficulty when you were putting down the material with the squeegee, sometimes you don’t see the squeegee lines. The broom is an excellent way to blend everything together and make it look uniform. </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p><em>—This video is provided by <a href="http://goo.gl/8a27ML" target="_blank">Sakrete</a>, one of ProTradeCraft's advertisers. A leader in concrete and concrete-related products for 80 years, Sakrete led the way for premixed bagged concrete and was the first company to provide concrete specified for strength, not proportion, which continues today.</em> <em><a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/sakrete-videos-and-guides">View all of Sakrete's content</a></em></p> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 02 Jun 2020 05:00:33 +0000 sakrete 2696 at https://www.protradecraft.com The Model ReModel Show: A Humpy Bumpy Foundation https://www.protradecraft.com/video/model-remodel-show-humpy-bumpy-foundation <span>The Model ReModel Show: A Humpy Bumpy Foundation</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Sat, 05/30/2020 - 00:11</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/vkmx8qyQ0b0&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=K1bzx6YMONrrdChsbLWk0P0C5zv38u5qsAZtJAfzHPA" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="The Model ReModel Show: A Humpy Bumpy Foundation"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>Floor layout and framing, some good news from the building inspector, and a pleasant surprise on the adhesive front</h2> <p>Episode 3: Floor Framing</p> <p>Last time on the Model Remodel Show, we were<a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/model-remodel-show-%E2%80%94-quick-take-down"> taking the house down to the bare foundation</a>—At least as far as we could </p> <blockquote> <p>"So that we'd fall still within the criterea of a remodel." </p> </blockquote> <p>This meant leaving a couple of walls and framing a house around them.</p> <p>They began by cutting the roof into sections and plucking it off the walls, which they then picked up and carted away, before cutting up the floor and removing it too.</p> <p>And that’s where we pick up this week on Professional Remodeler’s 2017 Model Remodel.</p> <p>This week, they want to frame and sheathe the floor and get ready for wall framing next time.</p> <blockquote> <p>"We had our first inspection for our foundation with the official who is going to be inspecting the rest of out project, and we were kind of nervous to see how that went. </p> <p>And he came in and made the funny comment of 'You're not going to keep those three walls, are you?';</p> <p>Which I replied 'Well, we're keeping them to meet your local statutes to qualify as a remodel.' to which he replied 'Oh, absolutely not. Take those down, go right ahead and do whatever you need top do...'</p> <p>So, we're starting off on a really great foot with the local official."</p> </blockquote> <p>The challenge being this week's challenge is that the foundation is old, humpy, and out of square. </p> <p>So there's that.</p> <p>Humpy old foundations can be a crummy starting point for level floors. To make sure the floor framing is level, Ben shims the mudsills using a level transit. </p> <p>To reduce the effects of out of level corners and big humpy bumps, he uses extra thick mudsills that can be half-lapped at the corners, which are screwed together to create a stable structure less prone to variations.</p> <p>He staples the sill seal to the bottom of the mudsill before laying it down, and the masons fill the gaps under the mudsill with mortar. </p> <p>Now we have a solid flat foundation for floor framing.</p> <blockquote> <p>"We have a really nice square level foundation that we're working off of. The floor deck went in really well with TJIs, There's a little bit of prep with them, but you can make some speed with it. </p> <p>We made a couple of choices to speed things up, we went with a single-piece center beam vs. handling multiple laminations of LVLs which we were able to swing into place in one piece with the excavator. </p> <p>Established out layout as far as any plumbing that we needed to accommodate, worked off the layout to set the joist hangers, prepped the TJIs, and then just rolled right through setting our TJIs and rim boards."</p> </blockquote> <p>The rim joist is an integral part of the air barrier system because it is a place where a lot of materials come together. Ben seals the rim to the plate and the other rims at the corners.</p> <p>And now they can install some Advantech subfloor</p> <blockquote> <p>"We were happy to be using AdvanTech for our subflooring, AdvanTech is our subflooring of choice on all of our projects.</p> <p>New for us on this installation is we got to try the new aerosol canned adhesive.</p> <p>All in all, after using it today, we're going to keep using it. "​</p> </blockquote> <p>With the sheets down, whacked, and gapped, the sheets are screwed down, for a squeak-free floor.</p> <blockquote> <p>"All in all, we're in pretty good shape timeline-wise. I'm not feeling stressed over it.</p> <p>Next week we're going to be taking down those three walls and the floor system off that section of the house. There's some question as to what we're going to find, but we have a couple of strategies, depending on what we find.</p> <p>At that point we'll be handing it over to the masons to do the prep work for us to do our sills on that section. While they are handling that end of the building, we're going to start standing some walls using Zip R12  2-1/2 in insulated sheathing.</p> <p>The goal is to have all of the <a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/model-remodel-show-energy-smart-walls-skinny">exterior walls</a> and floor system complete by the end of next week, we have our structural truss delivery on Friday, so we'd be in good shape at the end of the week if we can hit those..."</p> </blockquote> <p> </p> <p><em style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(98, 96, 94); font-size: 14px; font-family: Roboto;">—The Model Remodel Show is a production of the SGC Horizon Media Network and was shot on location at the <a href="http://2017.prmodelremodel.com/" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; background: transparent; color: rgb(247, 58, 65); text-decoration-line: none; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: 0px; line-height: inherit;">2017 Model Remodel</a> project in southern Connecticut.</em></p> <p> </p> </div> Sat, 30 May 2020 05:11:01 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4029 at https://www.protradecraft.com Support A Steel Plate with Precision Grout https://www.protradecraft.com/video/support-steel-plate-precision-grout <span>Support A Steel Plate with Precision Grout</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/sakrete" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sakrete</span></span> <span>Sat, 04/04/2020 - 08:24</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/MjOxjCEf6-I&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=-1x1De1gH18w05UrD0x9TdRB0WHztmTajCf4zw0T2kc" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="Support Steel Plate with Precision Grout by Sakrete"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>SPONSOR CONTENT</h2> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/MjOxjCEf6-I&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=-1x1De1gH18w05UrD0x9TdRB0WHztmTajCf4zw0T2kc" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="Support Steel Plate with Precision Grout by Sakrete"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field-name-field-copy field-type-text-long field-label-hidden field-item"><h2><a href="https://www.sakrete.com/" target="_blank"><img alt="sakrete-logo.png" src="https://www.protradecraft.com/sites/protradecraft/files/2019-04/sakrete-logo_0.png" style="margin: 9px; width: 150px; float: right;" /></a>Pourable construction grout makes it easy to fill the tough spots</h2> <p>Sakrete Precision Non-Shrink Construction Grout is a non-shrink and non-metallic. When properly mixed to a fluid consistency allows for pumping grout to areas where it is difficult to access using conventional grouting methods.</p> <h3>Preparation/Application:</h3> <ul> <li>Use only when the product, air, and surface temperature are above 400F (40C) for a minimum of 24 hours.</li> <li>Clean area and remove all unsound concrete, grease, oil, paint, and any other foreign material that will inhibit performance.</li> <li>Prior to grout placement, all surfaces must be clean and saturated with water for 24 hours. Remove excess water bringing it to a surface saturated dry condition (SSD).</li> <li>Provide air relief holes where necessary if grouting is beneath large plates.</li> <li>Wood form work or other absorbent forms should be coated with a form release oil to prevent grout adherence and water absorption.</li> <li>Design form work to facilitate rapid, continuous and complete filling of the space to be grouted. Rodding the grout lightly will help move material.</li> <li>Use methods that will enable the grout to flow by gravity between the surfaces and keep the grout in full contact with these surfaces until it has hardened.</li> <li>Avoid vibration which can cause bleeding and segregation. Shut down nearby machines for a minimum of 24 hours. </li> <li>Minimum application thickness is 1” (25 mm) and a maximum thickness of 4” (100 mm).</li> </ul> <p> <style type="text/css"> <!--/*--><![CDATA[/* ><!--*/ p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 9.0px Helvetica} /*--><!]]>*/ </style> </p> <h3>Mixing:</h3> <ul> <li>Only mix with clean potable water. The water quantities shown are approximate and may vary slightly with the type of equipment and application conditions.</li> <li>Water demand and mix temperature must be determined using standard test methods for consistency and temperature measurement at the time of application.</li> <li>Place 3/4 of desired mixing water, start mixer then slowly add the dry material. After all of the powder has been added, slowly add the remaining 1/4 water until the desired consistency is achieved.</li> <li>Avoid adding excessive amounts of water that promotes segregation or bleeding of the grout.</li> <li>Mix for 3 - 5 minutes to ensure a uniform lump free consistency and place immediately.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3>Desired grout consistency:</h3> <ul> <li>Fluid: 1 gal + 1 pt (4.3 L) per 50 lb (22.7 kg)</li> <li>Flowable: 1 gal (3.8 L) per 50 lb (22.7 kg)</li> <li>Plastic: 3 qts + 1 pt (3.3 L) per 50 lb (22.7 kg)</li> </ul> <h3>Curing:</h3> <ul> <li>Sakrete Construction Grout can be exposed under normal weathering conditions. </li> <li>Forms may be removed as soon as the grout reaches its final set. </li> <li>Prevent rapid water loss by covering the exposed grout surfaces with wet burlap during the first 48 hours or apply an acceptable water based cure and seal agent.</li> <li>Protect from freezing for a minimum of 48 hours after placement. ACI 308 Standard Practice for Curing Concrete.</li> </ul> <h3>Precautions:</h3> <p>Air, mix and substrate temperatures should be between 40°F and 100°F (4°C and 38°C).</p> <ul> <li>Colder temperatures or higher humidity conditions will retard set times.</li> <li>Do not use in applications of high dynamic loading.</li> <li>Do not retemper grout by adding water.</li> <li>Do not use as a floor topping or in large areas with an exposed shoulder around base plates.</li> <li>Do not add accelerators, retarders, plasticizer or other additives.</li> <li>Do not apply in application thicknesses &lt;1” (25 mm) or &gt; than 4” (100 mm).</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3>Safety:</h3> <ul> <li>READ and UNDERSTAND the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) before using this product.</li> <li>WARNING: Wear protective clothing and equipment.</li> <li>For emergency information, call CHEMTREC at 800-424-9300 or 703-527-3887 (outside USA).</li> <li>KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>NOTES:</p> <ul> <li>It is the responsibility of the installer/applicator to ensure the suitability of the product for its intended use.</li> <li>For installation where acids and sulfates are present, a protective coating is required. Protect uncoated aluminum from direct contact with Portland cement-based materials.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <h3>More Info:</h3> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.concrete.org/Portals/0/Files/PDF/302.1R-15_Chapter5.pdf" target="_blank">ACI 302.1 Guide for Concrete Flooring and Slab Construction</a></li> <li>ACI 304.1 Guide for Measuring, Mixing, Transportation and Placing Concrete.</li> <li>ACI 351. R-99 Report on Grouting Between Foundations and Bases for Support Equipment and Machinery</li> <li>ACI 351.2R Foundations for Static Equipment</li> <li>ACI 306R Cold Weather Concreting</li> <li>ACI 305R Hot Weather Concreting</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p><em>—This video is provided by <a href="http://goo.gl/8a27ML" target="_blank">Sakrete</a>, one of ProTradeCraft's advertisers. A leader in concrete and concrete-related products for 80 years, Sakrete led the way for premixed bagged concrete and was the first company to provide concrete specified for strength, not proportion, which continues today.</em> <em><a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/sakrete-videos-and-guides">View all of Sakrete's content</a></em></p> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Sat, 04 Apr 2020 13:24:38 +0000 sakrete 4143 at https://www.protradecraft.com How to Caulk Concrete Control Joints https://www.protradecraft.com/video/how-caulk-concrete-control-joints <span>How to Caulk Concrete Control Joints</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Mon, 03/09/2020 - 06:00</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/lBc2SXiEtd8&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=-vld6J0CmIL6s822f21bjNvLEBPzslg9wHKzAv5dJuM" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="How to Caulk Concrete Control Joints with Perfect Results Every Time"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>The keys to a clean polyurethane control joint between two concrete slabs </h2> <p>Before squeezing sticky stuff into the gap, get a grip on the process.  Preparation steps before sealing a control joint in a concrete slab:</p> <p>1: Use a polyurethane caulk, NOT the self-leveling kind. Matt uses Tremco's Dymonic Fast Cure, but Sikka makes one, as does NP1.</p> <p>2. Don't get a cheap caulk gun. Just say no to cheap tools.</p> <p>3. Rather than tubes and tiny guns, choose a sausage system. Foil sausage tubes provide more product, less waste, and less packaging than plastic tubes. They also allow you to change the tip size on the caulk gun. </p> <p><strong>TIP: When cutting the end off of the sausage tube, use side-cutters, not a utility knife. Avoid at all costs the opportunity for any of that polyurethane caulk to get on any part of you. </strong></p> <p><strong>Because a tool is an extension of a carpenter, the utility knife applies. Side-cutters allow you to snip the end off cleanly in a single motion, so none of the polyurethane is pushed out of the end, nor does it stowaway on the tool.</strong></p> <p>4. Other tool/products needed for the job:</p> <ul> <li>Knee pads. They help preserve the pants and the knees.</li> <li>Masking tape. Multiple widths, from a quality manufacturer. Matt chooses SCOTCH masking tape from 3M.</li> <li>409 Multisurface cleaner</li> <li>Fine silica sand. It is the key to a perfect job that will last (and look good) for a long time. Fine silica sand is better than play sand, which tends to have little pebbles and rocks in it. Matt uses plastic squeeze bottles or larger juice containers to dispense the sand, and a small paintbrush to distribute it.</li> <li>Paper towels for cleaning polyurethane from the nozzle.</li> </ul> <p>With the pile of tools defined, Matt heads to the job. Clean the joint with a diamond wheel on an angle grinder to make a uniform gap between the driveway and garage slab. After cleaning it up, clean it out with a leaf-blower or compressed air.  </p> <p>Wear PPE when grinding concrete. <strong><a href="https://www.protradecraft.com/video/silicosis-lung-disease-you-get-masonry-dust-it-can-kill-you" target="_blank">Silicosis is real.</a></strong></p> <p> </p> <h2>The tape defines the line of the concave bead</h2> <p>Apply masking tape to both sides of the joint just below the crown of the tooled edges. The convex edges will ease into the concave joint for a smooth appearance.</p> <p>Apply the tape to both sides with finger-pressure to seal the edge of the tape and to define straight lines. The joint will be concave, and the edges will be able to feather out into the sides without encroaching on the driveway.</p> <p>At T-intersections, miter the tap, overlapping the miters, to yield a sharp corner.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Work in short sections—depending on the weather</h2> <p>Matt moves from right to left because he is right-handed. Your mileage may vary. Don't dispense more than you can tool at a time. If the wind kicks up a little bit, it can blow dust, leaves, and other debris into the wet polyurethane, which will ruin the appearance of the finished product.</p> <p>Try to apply the caulk to be as close to how the finished product should look as possible. Look for the slight concave finish with the joint full. Don't starve or overfill the joint.</p> <p>Let the caulk work its way down into the joint. Let the bead build ahead of the tip, to you can see that it is getting down to the bottom of the crack.</p> <p>Hold the gun perpendicular to the control joint, at about a 45-degree angle, squeeze the sausage, and slide sideways. Allow the polyurethane caulk to push its way ahead of the nozzle so that you can see the caulk fill the joint.</p> <p>The rounded trailing surface of the nozzle will form the rough concave edge on the bead. The idea is not to get the finished bead while applying, but the closer you can get, the easier it is to make it look great later.</p> <p> </p> <h2>409 doesn't seem controversial, but watch this</h2> <p>The instructions on the Tremco Dymonic tube say to dry-tool the joint. However, other Tremco polyurethane products say right on the container that mild soapy water can be used. </p> <p>Some people think that using 409 in this way will cause the polyurethane caulk to bubble, but Matt says that he has done thousands of feet of control joint this way and has never seen bubbles, failure, or even mild problems. He also offers this alternative:</p> <blockquote> <p>"If you've had conflicting experience, or just don't like this idea, well, then just don't use it."</p> </blockquote> <p>Dry-tooling polyurethane is difficult at best. It is sticky and difficult to work with. A quick spritz of the 409 and a fingertip makes that polyurethane tool like magic.</p> <p>The critical detail is feathering the bead at the edge of the masking tape rather than tooling in a step.</p> <p> </p> <h2>Finish the bead</h2> <p>Remove the masking tape across the bead, so that any sealant that may have built up along the edge of the tape is directed back into the joint. The side can be cleaned up with a spritz of 409 and a finger</p> <p>Generously sprinkle silica sand onto the tooled bead. The excess will blow away after the polyurethane has dried. The protective sand coating does two things:</p> <p>It protects the wet polyurethane caulk from bugs, dirt, and debris (it also protects shoes who have unconscious owners).</p> <p>It provides a rough surface finished texture similar to freshly finished concrete.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>—Matt Jackson is a master carpenter, remodeler, SketchUp Wiz, </em><em><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/thetimbertailor" target="_blank">YouTuber</a>,</em><em> and contributing editor to ProTradeCraft. He lives and works in Rapid City, South Dakota. </em></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 09 Mar 2020 11:00:00 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4753 at https://www.protradecraft.com Basics of Foundation Waterproofing: Use Gravity and Membranes to Stop Capillarity https://www.protradecraft.com/video/basics-foundation-waterproofing-use-gravity-and-membranes-stop-capillarity <span>Basics of Foundation Waterproofing: Use Gravity and Membranes to Stop Capillarity</span> <span><span lang="" about="/users/daniel-morrison" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Daniel Morrison</span></span> <span>Mon, 03/02/2020 - 09:28</span> <div class="field field-name-field-media-video-embed field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden field-item"><article> <div class="field field-name-field-media-oembed-video field-type-string field-label-hidden field-item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/3tuvEU2Yg_c&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=tockbmKUgdJSAAuT6qZ_7yOmtEJWac1g-SnQYTCfNIE" frameborder="0" allowtransparency width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="Foundation Waterproofing Simplified"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden field-item"><h2>Use gravity and capillary breaks to stop water from seeping into the basement</h2> <p>Jake Bruton with <a href="https://www.aarowbuilding.com/" target="_blank">AAROW BUILDING</a> is at the Glen Eagle addition in Columbia, Missouri, where he's working with <a href="https://brianmorganarchitects.com/" target="_blank">Brian Morgan Architects</a> on a two-car garage and 1,000 square foot master-suite addition above.</p> <p>But today, Jake is talking about the basics of foundation waterproofing. </p> <p>The first foundation waterproofing layer is a paint-on membrane applied with rollers and chip brushes to seal all of the cracks and gaps. Fifteen years ago, builders in Columbia would have called it a day after applying the paint-on layer. Nowadays, we add a belt and suspenders to that clean underwear.</p> <p><strong><em>[Editor's Note: Sorry, Joe Lstiburek made me do it.]</em></strong></p> <p>The paint-on layer can still let water in through hidden cracks and gaps. So like high-performance builders all over North America, Jake does more to protect his customers. </p> <p>The next layer is a dimpled sheet made from plastic. Its physical relief makes an air space between the dimple-sheet and the foundation. The air space isn't so air can circulate; it is to stop any notion of wicking in the water's mind.</p> <p>Because gravity is stronger than capillarity, they are both relentless, but gravity has some advantages.</p> <p>The dimple-sheet turns over the footing, keeping gravity + capillarity from being a problem.</p> <p>The footing should also be painted with a waterproofing membrane, as the walls were. Conscientious builders waterproof the footing before pouring the wall to provide a capillary break right from the get-go.</p> <p>Next to the footing is the drainage system: filter fabric, gravel, perforated pipe, gravel, filter fabric, gravel.</p> <p>When installing the perforated pipe, place the holes down. Water should be able to get out and away as soon as possible, and if the water is coming from below, it will not need to pile up over the pipe before being shuttled away. If water flows into the pipe from the bottom, it will keep flowing the direction that the pipe slopes.</p> <p>Jake thinks this is a best practice foundation and we agree.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>—Jake Bruton owns Aarow Building in Columbia, Missouri. Their <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1UlsJiFn7uYh_yaEvKGh0Q" target="_blank">YouTube channel </a>covers new construction and remodeling.</em></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-video-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--video-collection paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-page-element-collection field-type-entity-reference-revisions field-label-hidden field-items"> <div class="field-item"> <div class="paragraph paragraph--type--test paragraph--view-mode--default"> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 02 Mar 2020 15:28:21 +0000 Daniel Morrison 4755 at https://www.protradecraft.com