Ben Bogie | April 03, 2018


Video // Plumbing, Electrical, Insulation & Air Sealing

Think About Batts When Running Electrical Cable

 

Your electrician can make the insulation work better and easier to install

 

To eliminate one of the tricky parts of installing batt insulation, eliminate the need to split the batt around the sheathed cable. Rather than letting the electrician install wire at whatever height she wants, Ben Bogie specifies the height to be 47 inches above the bottom plate. It is not an arbitrary number, though, it is the height of the rock wool batts that will be installed in the stud bays. 

Now, when they install the batts, they can put one under the wire and one over. Even if the electrician is off by an inch, you'll only need to split the top  (or bottom) of a batt rather than the bottom 18 inches.

It is also easier to drill a hole through every stud in the house at a height that allows you to stand up, rather than bend over.

 

—This tip was collected onsite at Professional Remodeler's 2017 Model Remodel project in southern Connecticut.

 

Comments

You are putting the electric wire at the same height as the drywall screws. Good luck with that. 

Daniel Morrison's picture

MG, 

I'm not sure ai follow your point. Drywall screws generally extend the entire height of the wall, don't they? And cover plates are generally required—and a good idea—where pipes and wires go through studs, right?

 

Daniel Morrison's picture

MG, 

I'm not sure I follow your point. Drywall screws generally extend the entire height of the wall, don't they? And cover plates are generally required—and a good idea—where pipes and wires go through studs, right?

 

while the idea has some merit, the previous comment applies. At the placement height you have designated, there falls the joint(s) of drywall, thus preventing adequate securement of said sheets. rule of thumb is you always try to avoid situations like this. put the plate in the field. secondly, most electricians dont really care, except for the small amount of extra wire. Lastly, most builders use spray foam and or full length batts, roxul being the specialty application exception, not the entire envelope. This would be a possible suggestion geared more to the DIY'r than the seasoned professional.

Moving the location of Romex in a stud bay to make batt insulation easier to install and more efficient does have merit. As part of a net zero house demonstration, Rick Chitwood shows how Romex, run through a hole drilled near the bottom of the stud, and stapled along the bottom plate, offers the same advantages as Ben Bogie's idea but works with any size batt. In addition, if you can get the framers to help, they can gang drill the studs while they are still in a bundle. 

(http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/sites/default/files/Zero_Net_Energy_...) is full of innovative tips 

Moving the location of Romex in a stud bay to make batt insulation easier to install and more efficient does have merit. As part of a net zero house demonstration, Rick Chitwood shows how Romex, run through a hole drilled near the bottom of the stud, and stapled along the bottom plate, offers the same advantages as Ben Bogie's idea but works with any size batt. In addition, if you can get the framers to help, they can gang drill the studs while they are still in a bundle. 

 

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